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texasbill
01-21-2003, 04:20 PM
Well getting ready for Super Bowl Sunday and think I will fire up the pit and cook a few briskets. Have some people who would like me to cook them brisket, ribs, and chickens. Slow smoked at 200 degrees for 18 hours using TexasBBQRub and they are perfect. Here is all I do. First take a whole untrimmed brisket and cover one side with worcheshire sauce. Then take a handful of rub and spread it across the meat covering everything on the sides too. Flip it over and repeat the process. I put the brisket on the pit, fat side down, cook at 200-215 degrees indirect heat using mesquite wood for 18 hours. I do wrap the briskets around 12 hours. This is a wonderful piece of meat, juicy and tender. I don't use any sauce for my brisket but some prefer sauce on their meat.

Bill Cannon
TexasBBQRub.com


TEXAS STYLE BBQ BEEF BRISKET

This is the mainstay for most BBQ's down here in Texas. I was told one time by a couple of Kansas City BBQ Judges that my brisket would rank among the top 3 briskets they had ever tasted or judged. Both of them had been judges at the Kansas City BBQ for 15 years and I ran into them while I was cooking in Jacksonville, Fla. at a cook-off. They also said that only people from Texas could cook a good brisket; but, I'm here to tell you that you can do this and it will be great. This is the same way I cook all of my brisket and have done so for years.

What you will need.

1- whole untrimmed brisket (they can be from 7 to 14 pounds) Get a small one if you
don't have a long time to cook.
TIP: When selecting a brisket to cook pick up the brisket and see if you can fold the
two ends together (or close to one another). I have found these to be the best
to cook.
¼ cup of worcestershire sauce
1 ½ to 2 cups of TEXAS BBQ RUB

First, never trim the brisket. You want the fat on the meat while it is smoking. The brisket will have 1 side that is covered with fat and the other side with just a little fat. Start with the fat side and shake worcestershire sauce on it and rub it with your hands all over the fat side of the brisket (including the sides and ends). Next take a handful of TEXAS BBQ RUB and rub it over the fat side of the brisket right on top of the worcestershire sauce. Apply the rub fairly thick. Remember this piece of meat is big and is going to be cooking for quite a while. Flip the brisket over and repeat the worcestershire sauce and rub routine on the other side of the brisket. Since this is the side that will cook up on the pit apply about 1 ½ handfuls of rub on this side. You will notice that the rub has started to turn into a paste. This is what you want to see. If it is not then add a little more worcestershire. That is it, it is ready to cook.

Use the indirect method of cooking, use a great tasting wood flavor (I use mesquite) and place the brisket, fat side down on the rack in the cooker. Point the thick side of the brisket toward the heat source.

Cook as follows:
180 degrees - Cook for a total of 16 to 18 hours
200 degrees - Cook for a total of 12 to 16 hours
225 degrees - Cook for a total of 8 to 12 hours

The brisket will be done when a food thermometer reads 185 to 190 degrees and is usually done before the above cooking times but you need to cook it long and slow. The longer it cooks the more tender it gets.

TIP: Never cook at above 225 degrees as this will boil the fat out of the center of the meat.

OK now for the SECRET that will make your brisket as tender as any meat you have ever eaten. About 2/3 of the way through the cooking of the brisket you are going to wrap the brisket in aluminum foil. Double wrap in foil. Tear off about 2 pieces of heavy duty foil approx. 24 inches to 30 inches long. Take the brisket off of the cooker (don't poke it with a fork or anything else as you let out great juices) I use heavy rubber gloves to handle all of my meat with. The brisket is going to be real hot so be careful. Place the brisket on the first sheet of foil. Fold up the edges of the foil to keep the sauce we are getting ready to add from getting everywhere. Take about 1 - 1 ½ cups of the bbq you made earlier and pour over the brisket (you should still be fat side down). Now wrap it in the first piece of foil, then wrap another piece around that. Place it back on the pit, fat side down again. Finish cooking. When you are ready to take off the grill be real careful as you might tear the foil and the sauce and juices of the meat can get on you and they will be hot. Take the brisket in and let it rest (cool down) approx. 45 minutes to 1 hour. I take my knife and scrape off the fat on the top of the brisket and then cut into ¼ inch pieces against the grain. The fat end of the brisket has more fat than the thin end. With a little practice you will learn how to carve off the fat before slicing.

A brisket will lose approx. 30% of its weight during cooking. You can figure approx. ½ pound of meat per person. And the leftovers (I hope you have some) are even better the day after you cook. Make a brisket sandwich with cold brisket or heat it back up by wrapping it in foil and heating it at a low temperature.
THIS IS SOME FANTASTIC PIECE OF MEAT. ENJOY.

JasonB
02-03-2003, 03:33 PM
Funny that this should be one of the first posts...i just did a brisket last week.

I don't have access to a pit right now and it's freeeeezing out here in Pennsyltucky, so i opted to do this in the oven. Good BBQ isn't impossible in the oven, but it still takes a good bit of time to do it right.

I started with a whole brisket. I put slices of garlic into slits cut WITH the grain of the meat, inserting about 8 whole cloves into a 5 lb brisket. Then, I rubbed the brisket down with a good rub with a little kick, making sure to rub the meat down with worcestershire sauce first. I'd be using the TBBQ rub, but havn't gotten my free samples yet [nudge nudge] . I tossed this in to an oven preheated to 300, and turned the oven immediately down to 250. This just ensures that the oven is hot and ready. About 2 hours into cooking, i add a couple cups of home made bbq sauce (use your favorite..stay away from the really sweet sauces) and let this bake covered until it pulls apart easily with a fork. My mouth is watering again...dammit.

Happy cookin' :)

avagadro
04-05-2003, 03:36 PM
Txbill,

Do you wrap the meat for the first 12 hours or the last 12 hours?

Thanx

George

texasbill
04-06-2003, 11:57 AM
George:

My total cooking time is usually in the 18 hour range. For the big briskets I will cook them up to 24 hours as they need the extra time to get to that tender stage.

I wrap my briskets the last 6 hours of cooking. For a bisket in the 10 to 12 pound class total cooking time of 15 to 18 hours I will wrap the last 6 hours. For large briskets in the 14 to 16 pound category the toal cooking time could be up to 24 hours and wrapping is the last 6 hours.

Hopes this helps you out. The last newsletter had an article aboout how meat (a muscle) is made up. If you read it carefully you will see why a brisket has to cook for a long time to get to tenderness. Internal temp should reach the 160 to 165 degree mark to break down the collagen.

Bill
Texas BBQ Rub

jptexas
10-18-2008, 08:57 AM
like bill let them cook and wrap them later. dont forget the texas brisket rubb great rubb on the briskets you will lone them i do.

Joey
01-27-2009, 03:17 AM
Alright, I'm sold. I'm gonna have to try this method with my next one. :)

txsmkmstr
01-27-2009, 09:54 AM
......I'm gonna have to try this method with my next one. :)

I looked at a lot of different ways to cook a brisket before actually trying one. Bill's method made the most sense to me (not that the others are wrong) and also seemed pretty easy. The result - an awesome display of goodness that my friends are raving about... even the leftovers that were frozen and re-heated came out wonderful.

Whether it's your first one or your hundredth one you should try this method at least once. :thumbs:

SLS_Colorado720
01-29-2009, 10:18 PM
OK - bought a 9 1/2lb uncut brisket to smoke on Superbowl sunday. Initially for our family of 5 but we were invited to a friends house so I'll just bring it over there after cooking. Will that size feed about 12 to 15 people or should I get a second brisket?

I have an Old Smokey electric smoker that has a large round grate on top then a smaller grate about a foot lower. I anticipated cooking the single brisket 16 hours and wrapping after 12 hours (TX BBQ RUB already on hand).

Sound about right?

NW Cheesehead
03-09-2009, 02:41 PM
For Brisket, I always figure 1/2 pound per adult min. and 1/4 pound for kids,
never hurts to have extra. I have watched some guys scarf down better than a pound of my brisket and maple glazed ham in a sitting.
:drool:

barbefunkoramaq
03-14-2009, 01:40 PM
I looked at a lot of different ways to cook a brisket before actually trying one. Bill's method made the most sense to me (not that the others are wrong) and also seemed pretty easy. The result - an awesome display of goodness that my friends are raving about... even the leftovers that were frozen and re-heated came out wonderful.

Whether it's your first one or your hundredth one you should try this method at least once. :thumbs:

And here is My way...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQCeXzhWz3U&feature=PlayList&p=70A4BAEF4CB51071&index=0

enjoy the world of 270 and above

Kreuz, Smittys, Blacks, Angelos, Muellers, Taylor, Southside

Mac
03-14-2009, 03:39 PM
Another perspective doesn't hurt any thang. I enjoyed the music Mr Funkenstein! Way to go! :thumbs:

totally smoked
03-17-2009, 07:16 PM
Hmmm...That is pretty cool..and the tunes fit the Q! Thanks :)

Wornslick
03-17-2009, 07:43 PM
That was great, thought the sleeping in the chair part was very funny. Thumbs up here, :thumbs:

P.S. The brisket looked great too!!!!!!!

Woodman
03-21-2009, 08:13 AM
You left out the part about how ya gotta use at least 8 ft of foil per brisket!!!!!:shock::roflmaoha0:

Dirty Ron
03-22-2009, 05:55 PM
Good post Bill. The guys who are cooking just flats may not need all that time....I usually dont, because of cost, space & time contstraints...Woody doesnt either, as he usually buys his in a pre-packaged deal at Sams Club

gcrook
03-29-2009, 12:21 PM
Hi Bill:
I am a new member from Florida. I have used 210 degrees for brisket and it has been very moist. On ribs I have done the same and they have been too moist.

Your opinion on collagen please.

THANKS:

txsmkmstr
03-29-2009, 06:48 PM
Hi Bill:
Your opinion on collagen please.


Needs to be airbrushed out.... :roflmaoha0::roflmaoha0:

Oops... I thought you meant cellulite.... :rolleyes: Nevermind....:D

Woodman
03-30-2009, 06:12 AM
Hi Bill:
I am a new member from Florida. I have used 210 degrees for brisket and it has been very moist. On ribs I have done the same and they have been too moist.

Your opinion on collagen please.

THANKS:


Well, I am not cetain what opinion you are looking for, or even that collagen lends itself to an opinion. It is the good stuff in the brisket that lives in the meat. When it finally melts and releases into the foil, it is the stuff that turns to jello when cooled in that foil. It is ,I believe, the same stuff they actually make jello from, or did at one time.

jptexas
03-30-2009, 06:13 PM
You left out the part about how ya gotta use at least 8 ft of foil per brisket!!!!!:shock::roflmaoha0:
man i used the whole roll :roflmaoha0::roflmaoha0::roflmaoha0:

Bull O' The Woods
04-06-2009, 09:45 AM
Awesome documentation... Could have seen more beer drinkin though. I incorporate it into my time frames... I usually wrap at about 16-18 :thumbs:

Hoat
06-23-2009, 07:32 AM
I am going to try and smoke my first brisket next week and I noticed in the video posted that the meet was placed in a pan. DO you place it in a pan or does it go right on the grills in the smoker? New to this. Thanks for any responses

HFD26
06-23-2009, 07:34 AM
On the grill.

Hoat
06-23-2009, 07:54 AM
On the grill.


Thanks

TexLaw
06-23-2009, 12:03 PM
I've done it either way and like it a little better just on the grate. The pan is good for collecting fat and juices, but I get a good amount of that from the time the brisket spends wrapped.


TL

joe arras
06-24-2009, 04:02 AM
How about putting the brisket on a cooling rack inside a pan. Best of both worlds.
Don't know for sure because I haven't done it. Just my :twocents:

Good luck :thumbs:

Smoke Daddy
09-04-2009, 11:52 AM
And here is My way...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQCeXzhWz3U&feature=PlayList&p=70A4BAEF4CB51071&index=0

enjoy the world of 270 and above

Kreuz, Smittys, Blacks, Angelos, Muellers, Taylor, Southside

This was great! and sweet pit in the avatar!

DarylCincy
09-04-2009, 01:21 PM
I am going to try and smoke my first brisket next week and I noticed in the video posted that the meet was placed in a pan. DO you place it in a pan or does it go right on the grills in the smoker? New to this. Thanks for any responses

Both for me!

I did up the best brisket I've done up yet just last weekend, it was a 14 lb full packer that I cooked it fat side down on the grate at a 275 degrees internal grate temp after about 7 hours the brisket internal meat temp was around 175 degrees and then I put it in a large foil pan with 12oz. of beer fat side down and I covered the foil pan with foil and finished it like that to a internal meat temp of 200 degrees, it finished in 10 hours. Then I took it out of the pan and wraped it in foil (about 3 wraps) and put it in a cooler wraped in towels fat side up for three hours, after that I pulled it out and slice it up and I took the juices I saved from the foil pan and poured some of it over the slices, it really turned out great that way. I did get the foil pan ideal from that video and it just worked out good. Also I used Texas BBQ Brisket Blend Rub with some Thick Lee Perrins Worchestershire Sauce to help make it stick.

CaliSmoker
10-07-2009, 09:32 PM
Anybody add a can of coke instead of beer? No thick L & P out here yet.

DarylCincy
10-07-2009, 09:40 PM
Anybody add a can of coke instead of beer? No thick L & P out here yet.

I hear some use a can of Doctor Pepper, I mite try it sometime.
I will use The Thick L-P from now on, it works out goood!

aya09
10-23-2009, 01:08 AM
We have tried sodas and satisfied. We usually used the diet ones - no sugar.

renoram2000
10-24-2009, 12:12 AM
Im doin a brisket in the mornin. I do not have any brisket blend. Can I use the regular texasbbqrub?

JamesB
10-24-2009, 01:12 AM
Im doin a brisket in the mornin. I do not have any brisket blend. Can I use the regular texasbbqrub?

Yes. The original rub was used for everything until they came out with the more specialized rubs.

smoken don
10-24-2009, 01:13 AM
Im doin a brisket in the mornin. I do not have any brisket blend. Can I use the regular texasbbqrub?

Yes,it will work just fine.

renoram2000
10-24-2009, 08:42 AM
Is this what they call the plateau? I pulled and wrapped at 165. It has been in there for about 45 minutes and has not moved up in temp. Is this ok and how long should this last. My first brisket. Thanks guys!

HFD26
10-24-2009, 10:52 AM
Is this what they call the plateau? I pulled and wrapped at 165. It has been in there for about 45 minutes and has not moved up in temp. Is this ok and how long should this last. My first brisket. Thanks guys!

Is this what they call the plateau?..... Yes

It has been in there for about 45 minutes and has not moved up in temp. Is this ok?...... Yes

How long should this last?.... It's done when you can insert a tooth pick, and it slides in with very little resistance, kind of like sticking the tooth pick in warm butter. It should be somewhere around 195* As far as how long this will take, I say, It's done when it's done.

Good luck.

DarylCincy
10-24-2009, 10:55 AM
Is this what they call the plateau? I pulled and wrapped at 165. It has been in there for about 45 minutes and has not moved up in temp. Is this ok and how long should this last. My first brisket. Thanks guys!
Maybe up to 1.5 hours, and you don't want to open the door on the smoker when its in the stall stage if you can help it because it may stall for 2 hours or more.

totally smoked
10-24-2009, 01:57 PM
Is this what they call the plateau? I pulled and wrapped at 165. It has been in there for about 45 minutes and has not moved up in temp. Is this ok and how long should this last. My first brisket. Thanks guys!

Lukes on the money...<----smart guy right there....


I think the plateau is cool...I have even seen the temps drop a couple...then when ya aint lookin...BOOM...your at 175 and climbing.

Takes some pics man...your first brisket..Good luck 8)

renoram2000
10-24-2009, 02:04 PM
Man, it got kind a scary. It stayed there for right around an hour and a half. But then started moving up like crazy. The pit temp stayed at 250 perty steadily. It only took about an hour after that to reach 193. Thats when I pulled it. You guys did say it was alright to hold for up to 4 hours in the cooler? Its in the foil with towels. Thanks guys. If i dont post any pics its cause it was ugly! I'll let ya'll know.

Texas 1836
10-25-2009, 07:36 AM
Man, it got kind a scary. It stayed there for right around an hour and a half. But then started moving up like crazy. The pit temp stayed at 250 perty steadily. It only took about an hour after that to reach 193. Thats when I pulled it. You guys did say it was alright to hold for up to 4 hours in the cooler? Its in the foil with towels. Thanks guys. If i dont post any pics its cause it was ugly! I'll let ya'll know.

Come on Ren, post those pics!! You will be surprised what a lot of these guys can tell you about the way it looks, but the real test is how it TASTES!! Hope it turned out well for you.

joe arras
10-25-2009, 07:54 AM
If you don't post any pics, DB won't have anything to eat today:roflmaoha0:

renoram2000
10-25-2009, 12:16 PM
Well, sorry guys. If i'm lying, i'm dying tonight! Followed all ya'lls advice and it came out great. :thumbs:The best bbq they have tasted(family) is that smittys in lockhart. So the more readily available bbq here is Bill millers! I musta heard atleast 20 times that it was way better than bill millers. These are the few leftovers so sorry about no pics of the bark. But it did look good. The bottom slice is bark.:shrug: Even when the family or even when I have done it the oven, it never came out this juicy. Even the thin part, dont know the correct bbq terminology, where there is less fat, was great. That is the part that is usually not eaten. The txbbqrub gave it a great flavor. I already got pleas to make brisket for them for their kids b-day partys. I'm so proud of the brisket I made I would hate to taste ya'lls... put my mine to shame. I'm gettin' there. Again, thanks guys and gals!!!!

Teddy N Texas
10-25-2009, 12:39 PM
Say, looks like you did a nice job.:thumbs: If you like this one just remember everything you did. You might want to do some tweaking on the next one.

smoken don
10-25-2009, 01:28 PM
Nice job! Looks great.:thumbs:

totally smoked
10-25-2009, 04:31 PM
Thanks for the pic...Nice smoke ring too :thumbs:

TexLaw
10-26-2009, 08:27 AM
That looks great! Nice job, man!


TL

Cooky'sCorner
01-10-2010, 02:51 AM
I rub mine down with a rub of my own preference.

KOSHER SALT
GARLIC POWDER,
ONION POWDER,
PAPRIKA
PEPPER,
THYME
Its rubbed and refrigerated for a while prior to cooking. I heat the pit up to between 3 and 400 deg. when I first put it on, and then leave it for a couple 3 hours till the fire needs stoking again. I have never cooked one more than 10 hours. I will try up to 18, and wrap it after 12. I use oak and mesquite wood.

Mac
01-10-2010, 08:23 AM
CC,

Welcome to the forum. As good as you think your home made rub is, do yourself a favor and try Bills Texas BBQ Rub. I promise you won't be sorry! :twocents:

bein2009
01-27-2010, 05:08 PM
I don't like the brisket that you get at walmart that is already seasoned. I think they are just too salty. I like to get the non-seasoned brisket, add some light salt and some soy sauce and grill it. Eating it fresh from the grill with some hot sauce is like taking a bite out of heaven!

jckkeith
03-03-2010, 01:40 AM
I buy a brisket joint every weekend. Put it in a roasting tin, put approximately 1/4 inch water in the bottom, cover with foil and put in oven for around 3-4 hours depending on the size, you can tell when it is cooked and tender when a skewer or fork slides in easily. I have a fan oven and put it on 150celcius, that would be 300farenheight or gas 2. I then use the stock to make my own gravy.

Jarrod
08-25-2010, 10:26 AM
Yes you really need to rap the brisket toward the end to make sure you don't dry it out too much. Once the meat reaches a certain temperature, its doesn't allow much smoke into it anyway. I seen people rap their meat first and then put it in the smoke which is rediculous. Smoke first and then rap. It will turn out great every time. Make sure you have a good BBQ sauce to compliment the meat. A great sauce can take you over the top.

Buckeye
08-25-2010, 04:19 PM
:rolleyes:....wow!.....:rolleyes:

Zeeman
08-25-2010, 04:27 PM
:rolleyes:....wow!.....:rolleyes:

Don't take long dez dayz ya know.:willynilly:
z

DJ Butter
08-25-2010, 05:59 PM
I buy a brisket joint every weekend. Put it in a roasting tin, put approximately 1/4 inch water in the bottom, cover with foil and put in oven for around 3-4 hours depending on the size, you can tell when it is cooked and tender when a skewer or fork slides in easily. I have a fan oven and put it on 150celcius, that would be 300farenheight or gas 2. I then use the stock to make my own gravy.
:zip::shakehead:

Half Fast BBQ'n
08-25-2010, 06:48 PM
:rolleyes:....wow!.....:rolleyes:

He needed to be banned. If for no other reason than cooking a brisket in a pan of water, IN THE OVEN :roflmaoha0::roflmaoha0:

bluffman2
08-25-2010, 06:49 PM
My Dad allways told me "LOW AND SLOW"...........God I miss his briskets :banghead:

Cheeks
08-25-2010, 06:50 PM
I'm gonna try this for the first time on labor day but I don't have smoker, just a gas grill.....should be interesting

TexLaw
08-26-2010, 08:32 AM
I certainly could be interesting. However, do not expect results like you would get from a barbeque pit. I do not mean that you should try or that what you want to do is not worth doing, but you are talking about a whole different method of cooking.


TL

Buckeye
08-26-2010, 10:48 AM
I certainly could be interesting. However, do not expect results like you would get from a barbeque pit. I do not mean that you should try or that what you want to do is not worth doing, but you are talking about a whole different method of cooking.


TL

...and taste.:banghead:

Buckeye
08-26-2010, 10:54 AM
I don't like the brisket that you get at walmart that is already seasoned. I think they are just too salty. I like to get the non-seasoned brisket, add some light salt and some soy sauce and grill it. Eating it fresh from the grill with some hot sauce is like taking a bite out of heaven!



Thoze my friend are whut ya call "corned beef".....thoze are cows that have taken a salt water bath of sum sort.

SpongeBob
08-26-2010, 11:00 AM
Brisket rap...:shrug:

CowHorn
08-26-2010, 12:35 PM
Eating it fresh from the grill with some hot sauce is like taking a bite out of heaven!

If that's what I've got to look forward to in heaven, go ahead and book my reservations to the place further south!

totally smoked
08-26-2010, 09:33 PM
Brisket rap...:idea:..I see a song a qfest in the makin...:)

DerrikMo
09-10-2010, 12:40 PM
Just found this site & forum yesterday, really great info and people. I posted a question yesterday concerning using cottonwood for bbq and got 6 replies in just a few hours. Nice to see and active and helpful group of members.

Now for my question. I have been doing briskets for over 20 years, and have been very happy with the results. My method pretty much follows yours except for one glaring difference. I have always cooked mine fat side up. Using the theory that as the fat drips, it would help keep the meat moist. What am I missing, and why should I change?

DerrikMo

Well getting ready for Super Bowl Sunday and think I will fire up the pit and cook a few briskets. Have some people who would like me to cook them brisket, ribs, and chickens. Slow smoked at 200 degrees for 18 hours using TexasBBQRub and they are perfect. Here is all I do. First take a whole untrimmed brisket and cover one side with worcheshire sauce. Then take a handful of rub and spread it across the meat covering everything on the sides too. Flip it over and repeat the process. I put the brisket on the pit, fat side down, cook at 200-215 degrees indirect heat using mesquite wood for 18 hours. I do wrap the briskets around 12 hours. This is a wonderful piece of meat, juicy and tender. I don't use any sauce for my brisket but some prefer sauce on their meat.

Bill Cannon
TexasBBQRub.com

SpongeBob
09-10-2010, 12:57 PM
Fat side up, Fat side down, you ask 100 people and probably be pretty close to 50/50. If yours are good then keep doing what your doing. Use the search feature several threads on this very subject.:thumbs:

Hcj3rd
09-10-2010, 01:52 PM
SpongeBob is correct. We that cook fat side down do so to protect the meat from the heat. You cook fat side up to get the fat flavor in the meat. Two schools of thought. Each there own.

louisep887
10-14-2010, 11:16 PM
like bill let them cook and wrap them later. dont forget the texas brisket rubb great rubb on the briskets you will lone them i do.







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mshane
11-05-2010, 06:32 AM
Some meats, like chicken, will benefit from either cooking method. It's great either grilled quickly with a glaze or barbecue sauce applied towards the end of the cooking time, or slowly barbecued, absorbing the flavors of the smoke.
BBQ (http://www.mikesbbqribs.com/)

Damon
12-22-2010, 01:50 PM
Needing a little advice, I have cooked a bunch of briskets in my time, but it seems that I can get my biggest part of my Brisket very tender, BUT I always get the tail end very dry??? Ive always smoked on a Oklahoma Joes smoker with side fire box for many years, but my wife for christmas just purchased me a 40 in Masterbuilt electric smoker and I figured I would try a brisket 1st, I have attached a picture of the smoker. I smoked with mesquite wood chips and set the temp for 225, after 8 hours I wrapped it and poured Bill's sauce that I made from his recipe on it and cooked until temp was at 200 and wrapped in towel and throw in cooler for few hours, it was great, as are ALL Bill's wonderful recipes, might I added, between his RUBS, Knives and gloves and recipe's, everyone and my neighbor hood thinks I am the KING of BBQ, Thanks Bill, just looking for a little advice, BTW, the electric smoker gave another reason to start a outdoor project my cooking shack, I started with BAMBOO walls, more pics to come in the future....

txsmkmstr
12-22-2010, 02:19 PM
Having some similar issues made me rethink the temp probe placement - The last couple I've put the probe into the flat and brought to 195 with good results... before it was into the thickest part and brought to 200+ and the flat would be dry. Also, don't forget that temp/time is just a starting point and the toothpick test is more definitive on when things are done.

Damon
12-22-2010, 03:19 PM
Thank you, I will try this next time and see how it turns out... :)

Texas 1836
12-22-2010, 08:59 PM
Damon, was your flat end result the same in the Masterbuilt??

Damon
12-23-2010, 01:55 PM
It was the same, Flat end was Dry and Big End was great, but I had my probe in the thickest part, I am going to do another one soon and try moving my probe and hopefully have improvements, I know one thing for sure, IT ALL ate great, We ate majority of the Big end and I saved the flat for BBQ sandwich, I chopped it up and then added water and some butter and boiled it until I could mash it up real good and then poured Bill's BBQ Sauce all in it and let it simmer for 1 1/2 hour or so, toasted up some Butter Hoogie's, spread the Que and topped with some cole slaw, YUMMY!!!

bigwheel
12-23-2010, 03:08 PM
Ok try this. At hour 4 of the smoke cycle wrap about the bottom third of the flat end with foil. Like a dancer wearing a hula skirt. Leave the top two thirds nekked. When it come hour 8 and time to wrap the whole brisket take off the skirt. That is a tried and true method of preventing the described problemo. Might have to fiddle with the timing some and even the placing of the skirt. One size do not fit all. Always do temp checking in the thickest part of the flat. The point is way too fat to bother checking..aint no way to over cook it etc. Or so I heard. Merry Christmas.

bigwheel

BluDawg
12-23-2010, 03:18 PM
It was the same, Flat end was Dry and Big End was great, but I had my probe in the thickest part, I am going to do another one soon and try moving my probe and hopefully have improvements, I know one thing for sure, IT ALL ate great, We ate majority of the Big end and I saved the flat for BBQ sandwich, I chopped it up and then added water and some butter and boiled it until I could mash it up real good and then poured Bill's BBQ Sauce all in it and let it simmer for 1 1/2 hour or so, toasted up some Butter Hoogie's, spread the Que and topped with some cole slaw, YUMMY!!!When you place the Brisket in the pit position it with the point toward the fire box it can take more heat and with the higher fat content is not prone to dry up like the tail of the flat. Works for me.

bigwheel
12-24-2010, 09:29 AM
Great point Blu

Damon
12-28-2010, 02:58 PM
I appreciate everyones response, Blu, this a electric smoker, so I dont have a offset firebox on it, look above in my post and you will see my electric smoker that I am trying to cook this Brisket in, I have thought about trying to foil the flat after a few hours, but never tried it, I will try this as a option next time, thanks again guy's....

ljfnord
01-17-2011, 08:37 AM
I could use a bit of advice here. This past weekend, I did a 15 hour cook of a brisket using the "1-2-3" formula from the "Secrets Revealed" page. I even went so far as to cook up a batch of sauce using the recipe from the “TRIED AND TRUE CHAMPIONSHIP RECIPES” e-mail I got after ordering some of the Old No. 2 Brisket Rub. I followed the instructions as closely as possible, but in the end neither my wife nor I were happy with the result.

Here's what I did. First, the hardware used:

Smoker: Big Green Egg (large w/plate setter)
Charcoal: Ozark Oak lump
Wood Chunks: Weber Firespice Applewood

Now, the software:

Brisket: Choice 9 lb. packer trim cryovac from a local SuperTarget (I had to trim a couple of inches off of the flat so that it would fit on the BGE - these trimmings went on the grill as "pinwheels" next to the main brisket).
Rub: TexasBBQRub's Old No. 2 - Brisket Rub, applied over Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce

Here are the steps I followed:

1. Started up the BGE with a full load of lump with a good supply of applewood chunks mixed in.
2. Pulled the brisket out of the cryovac pack, applied L&P, and put on the rub as per the recipe.
3. Got the temp range stabilized between 200 and 225 with the plate setter and grill installed (temps occasionally dipped to 190 due to cold/wet conditions, but on the high side I never topped 250).
4. Put the brisket on the grill, fat side down, with a wireless temp probe inserted at about 2/3rds of the way from the flat towards the tip (i.e., where the flat transitioned towards the thicker tip). Brisket temp at the time it went on the grill was 47 degrees.
5. Cooked up a batch of sauce while the brisket cooked. (I let it go for over four hours, but at two hours I reserved 1 1/2 cup of strained sauce since the original recipe called for putting on sauce that had been cooked up to two hours and didn't mention what would happen with a longer-cooked sauce.)
6. Pulled the brisket off when it went just over 165 degrees (I think it was 167) and removed the pinwheeled trimmings for a mid-cook snack.
7. Did the apply-sauce-and-double-foil-wrap step from the e-mail recipe.
8. Put the brisket back on the BGE, fat side down.
9. Replaced the temp probe in the same spot, and restabilized the temp range as above.
10. Pulled the brisket when it hit 195 degrees, put it fat-side down in a styrofoam chest, put a towel over it, and let it rest for two hours.

Total grill time was 15 hours, not including the two-hour rest.

What I expected was a brisket with a good bark, juicy meat, and well-rendered and carmelized fat. I got the juicy meat part in spades, but the bark was almost non-existent (with no smoke ring to speak of) and the fat was floppy and practically slid off of the muscle at a slight touch. The bottom part of the point fell apart when I tried to carve it. It almost literally looked like strands of spaghetti. The rest of the meat from the top of the point and from the flat carved off well, but there was a strange off-taste to the whole thing which reminded me of meat I'd had once that had been smothered in bottled sauce and cooked to death in a huge crock pot.

I know that neither the rub, the BGE, nor the fuel were at fault here, since the trimming pinwheels came out wonderfully (they were a bit dry, since I didn't monitor their temperature, but they had the attributes I was looking for nonetheless). I also know that the sauce batch was good - it even passed my wife's picky palate test. All I can figure is that the meat was steamed to death by the combination of the sauce and the wrapping.

Am I doing something wrong here, or am I expecting something that this method is simply not intended to provide? Any advice would be very much appreciated.

Thanks in advance!

cappy
01-17-2011, 10:29 AM
Your thermometer probe should be approximately centered in the flat like in this picture:

http://willsononline.com/bbq/bbqold/Brisket_Meat_on.jpg

Or even in this picture where the flat was a little thicker in one part and so they positioned the probe there:

http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:F6htrC3sTrsYUM:http://www.virtualweberbullet.com/brisket3_photos/brisket5.jpg&t=1

So in through the side in a relatively thick part of the flat, but not near the point. The point has too much fat and connective tissue and will not give a good reading if you have the probe there (you mentioned you positioned the probe where the flat transitions to the point).

If the flat is done, the point will be done.

The way some people check the flat for being finally done (after the temperature gauge says it is) is a toothpick test, where if the toothpick slide into the flat like into warm butter, it's done.

Wrapping a brisket isn't going to yield the kind of bark that cooking one naked will - the brisket being the one naked, of course :)

However, a wrapped brisket will more easily end up tender than a naked one for most people.

The point is usually going to end up chopped. I suppose you could also separate it from the flat and put the point back on the pit to give the point more bark.

When you carved yours, it probably was like what is in this video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L0epdvpNuhI&feature=related

You're not really going to experience caramelized fat. There is typically going to be a layer of fat that will slice off with a butter knife. However, some people do slice most of the fat from the brisket leaving only about a quarter-inch thick layer, most of which may render off during cooking. Whether this will work depends on your cooking equipment, methods, and temperatures.

Brisket can be cooked (depending on the smoker) at smoker temperature of anywhere from 225 to 350 degrees. On a Big Green Egg where the heat is directly below, it might not work as well at very high temps. But you might experiment with 250 degrees and see how that works for you, and if you like that, even try it up to 275 degrees which will shorten the cooking time.

I'm not sure why there would be little or no smoke ring. It sounds like you put the brisket in relatively cold (from the refrigerator) so it should have spent plenty of time for a smoke ring to form. Of course, the main part of the smoke ring will be on the top (non-fatty) side of the flat. Make sure to also slice the flat against the grain so the brisket slices have that marbled look to them. Grains can run at angles on a flat, and once it's cooked it can sometimes be hard to tell which way it goes, so some people might cut a corner to tell. Or, after you've separated the point, the flat exposed below the point usually shows the grain.

ljfnord
01-17-2011, 10:34 PM
Your thermometer probe should be approximately centered in the flat like in this picture:

http://willsononline.com/bbq/bbqold/Brisket_Meat_on.jpg

Or even in this picture where the flat was a little thicker in one part and so they positioned the probe there:

http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:F6htrC3sTrsYUM:http://www.virtualweberbullet.com/brisket3_photos/brisket5.jpg&t=1

Thanks, that makes sense. I debated putting the probe in the point, in the flat, or somewhere in between, and wound up shooting for a compromise. I'll put it in the center of the flat proper next time.

BTW, both photos show the probe going in from the side, rather than through the top of the flat. I thought I remembered reading somewhere that the tip of the probe should be inserted through the top of the meat instead of the side. Does it matter which way it goes in, as long as the tip itself is centered?

The way some people check the flat for being finally done (after the temperature gauge says it is) is a toothpick test, where if the toothpick slide into the flat like into warm butter, it's done.

I've been using a fork test on previous unwrapped briskets (this was the first one I'd cooked using a wrap), so I understand the concept. A toothpick will do less damage and be easier when it comes to penetrating the foil.

Wrapping a brisket isn't going to yield the kind of bark that cooking one naked will - the brisket being the one naked, of course :)

Only my wife knows what I was wrapped in, and she won't talk. :D

The point is usually going to end up chopped. I suppose you could also separate it from the flat and put the point back on the pit to give the point more bark.

What I'm actually shooting for is something similar to briskets I've had at the City Market in Luling and, most recently, at Franklin Barbecue in Austin. I saw the actual first carving of the brisket at Franklin, and his beef was perfect from end to end. Perfectly done flat, with a point that would have been sacrilege to turn into plain chopped beef.

You're not really going to experience caramelized fat. There is typically going to be a layer of fat that will slice off with a butter knife. However, some people do slice most of the fat from the brisket leaving only about a quarter-inch thick layer, most of which may render off during cooking. Whether this will work depends on your cooking equipment, methods, and temperatures.

So, a possible "thinning-out" of the cap fat might be what I'm looking for - is that what you're saying?

I'm not sure why there would be little or no smoke ring. It sounds like you put the brisket in relatively cold (from the refrigerator) so it should have spent plenty of time for a smoke ring to form.

It was very cold and drizzly outside in Garland this past weekend. That may have been part of the problem. I also did let the brisket set out for maybe a half-hour, but like I said, the probe temp was still 47 when it went on the grill. Regardless, I'll still try going directly from fridge to BGE next time.

Make sure to also slice the flat against the grain so the brisket slices have that marbled look to them.

That's the one area where I can actually say I have experience, thanks to my Grandfather - he didn't give up many of his secrets, but he did teach me how to slice properly. :D

One final thing - over on another blog, there is some info that someone managed to glean from Aaron Franklin himself about wrapping the meat. Apparently, Franklin uses butcher paper (http://texasbbqposse.blogspot.com/2010/12/butcher-paper-wrapped-brisket-posse.html) instead of foil and does not use a sauce. I am *very* tempted to try this - has anyone here heard of this method?

cappy
01-18-2011, 08:26 AM
1) BTW, both photos show the probe going in from the side, rather than through the top of the flat. I thought I remembered reading somewhere that the tip of the probe should be inserted through the top of the meat instead of the side. Does it matter which way it goes in, as long as the tip itself is centered?

2) So, a possible "thinning-out" of the cap fat might be what I'm looking for - is that what you're saying?

3) It was very cold and drizzly outside in Garland this past weekend. That may have been part of the problem. I also did let the brisket set out for maybe a half-hour, but like I said, the probe temp was still 47 when it went on the grill. Regardless, I'll still try going directly from fridge to BGE next time.

4) One final thing - over on another blog, there is some info that someone managed to glean from Aaron Franklin himself about wrapping the meat. Apparently, Franklin uses butcher paper (http://texasbbqposse.blogspot.com/2010/12/butcher-paper-wrapped-brisket-posse.html) instead of foil and does not use a sauce. I am *very* tempted to try this - has anyone here heard of this method?

1) Definitely go through the side, and keep it centered (top to bottom) in the flat. Going through the top would only have the tip of the probe penetrating and either possibly give a abd reading or at least not be very secure. I think I usually have mine stuck in a few inches when I stick them in through the side so they're definitely reading the internal temperature.

2) People either do or don't trim briskets, for various reasons but usually depending on time or put considerations. I think Paul Kirk trims all of his, but I believe he also is known to hang his briskets. One brisket-trimming guide here for example: http://www.virtualweberbullet.com/brisketselect.html#prepping

The usual argument of people who trim briskets is that while the fat cap helps to protect the meat from the heat of the long cooking times, all of that fat is not necessary to accomplish that - particularly when the fat cap starts off an inch thick as many do. So many people trim the fat cap to what they feel (from their experience and based on the cooking equipment and methods) is the minimum necessary. Also, the argument can be that seasoning a thick fat cap doesn't do much, while seasoning a trimmed thin fat cap may have some benefits. Regardless, the fat will come off one way or another - either pre-trimming it before the cook or else slicing it off after it's done. It's always worth experimenting to see what results and what works best for you.

3) Half an hour sitting out, that brisket was still pretty cold (you mentioned 47 degrees). Some people argue that meat should be close to room temperature before putting on a pit - because there are times when cold meat can accumulate a creosote taste early on due to temperature and smoke characteristics in some cooking conditions and situations. A counter-argument is that if a clean fire is built and burning, then a cold piece of meat will experience a longer period of time to accept smoke penetration. Half an hour is pretty typical time for prepping a brisket before putting it on the pit.

4) Give the butcher paper method a try, and see whether you like it. I've modified methods and recipes by trying different things until I've found what works for me that I like (for instance, I used to use apples in my baked beans, but I had some fresh cut pineapple one time that we hadn't used up and didn't feel like peeling and chopping apples, so I tried the pineapple and as a result liked it much better.) I don't put much juice in the foil when I wrap briskets to put back on the pit for the last phase. I'm also a fan of teriyaki which I use as a binder for rub, and usually splash I dunno, maybe a quarter cup in with the brisket when I wrap. I figure there will be plenty of juice already, it being wrapped, and I don't want too much. But I also don't pre-trim briskets, although I do select ones that don't have too thick a fat cap to begin with.

JolokiaRibKing
01-18-2011, 12:19 PM
great advice, cappy....thank you so much....i think you just convinced me to smoke a brisket this weekend!

ljfnord
01-19-2011, 12:35 AM
Definitely good advice, and that trimming link (http://www.virtualweberbullet.com/brisketselect.html#prepping) had a lot of other good info to boot. Thank you!

TexMexican
01-26-2011, 09:47 PM
And here is My way...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQCeXzhWz3U&feature=PlayList&p=70A4BAEF4CB51071&index=0]http://www.youtube.com/restaurant (http://www.redlobster.com/)/watch?v

enjoy the world of 270 and above

Kreuz, Smittys, Blacks, Angelos, Muellers, Taylor, Southside

Okay so now my mouth is watering barbe,

There is no way in the world I possess as much skill as you. I'm getting jealous and that is never a good thing.

CheeseheadJohn
01-27-2011, 08:59 AM
Not sure I understand the fat side down logic, seems fat side up would enable the fat layer to cook top to down with gravity, and keep meat moist...have read both ways now, not sure which is best? Also, have you tried the foil in cooler (Texas Crutch) method where pull meat off with 2 hrs to go and let finish in foil and closed cooler to final temp and to keep moist? Thanks for the great site!

HFD26
01-27-2011, 09:13 AM
Not sure I understand the fat side down logic, seems fat side up would enable the fat layer to cook top to down with gravity, and keep meat moist...have read both ways now, not sure which is best? Also, have you tried the foil in cooler (Texas Crutch) method where pull meat off with 2 hrs to go and let finish in foil and closed cooler to final temp and to keep moist? Thanks for the great site!

My logic to the fat side down is this. There is enough fat in the brisket to keep it moist during the cooking process. When you put the brisket on fat side up the meat side on the grill has a tendency to dry out. When you slice the brisket you have hard dried out stringy meat at the bottom on the meat side. The fat layer on the grill (fat side down) protects the meat from drying out. This is just my opinion. This fat side up or down thing is a personal preference. It's a subject that has been debated and beat to death. Do a search on this forum and you will find many, many threads that adress this subject. By the way, welcome to the forum. Head over to the new member section and introduce yourself to the rest of the forum.

CheeseheadJohn
01-27-2011, 09:22 AM
Thanks for the welcome, sort of a novice, have about 6 cook sessions under the belt, keep a cookin log too, bot a horizontal charcoal/wood smoker in Nov here in Wisc, built a modular plywood box to go around it and thermal blanket so can cook when 20F out, woorks great, have pics of it too (can we attach here?)...been fun and friends dig it, always fill her up and have extras...brisket and spare/St louis are best so far, and TBBQ Rub is key...cheers.

Bull
01-27-2011, 09:27 AM
When you sliced ur brisket did u slice with the grain or across. If u slice with the grain the meat could fall apart leading you to think it's over cooked.

HFD26
01-27-2011, 09:42 AM
Thanks for the welcome, sort of a novice, have about 6 cook sessions under the belt, keep a cookin log too, bot a horizontal charcoal/wood smoker in Nov here in Wisc, built a modular plywood box to go around it and thermal blanket so can cook when 20F out, woorks great, have pics of it too (can we attach here?)...been fun and friends dig it, always fill her up and have extras...brisket and spare/St louis are best so far, and TBBQ Rub is key...cheers.

You sure can post photos here, there is a thread section just for that. Look forward to your pics. Glad to have you here on the forum, lot's of BBQ knowledge here.

CheeseheadJohn
01-27-2011, 10:02 AM
posted 2 pics on the New Member thread, thanks again

CheeseheadJohn
01-31-2011, 12:34 PM
Me again (new guy), did 2 briskets at 5.5 lbs each Saturday, turned out great thanks to advice here as we enjoy the Wisc heat wave at 33F, expecting 18-24inches new tomorrow up here, will try to find a whole brisket in 10-15 lb range next time...here was my technique: whirstershire and TXBBQ rub in bag overnite, put on indirect smoker 10am (oak) and kept at 200-225F range fat side down, flipped at 3 hr mark (internal was 150F), I stop using wood after 3hrs, at 5 hr mark placed 2 briskets in foil pan covered tight (internal was 170F) til 6.5 hr point, took off smoker and let rest covered for 1 hr more..total at end was 7.5 hrs and almost perfect, good ring and bark, moist, nobody wanted BBQ sauce, friends impressed, so was dog Smokey...saved some juices for the few leftovers, thanks for the help.

ljfnord
02-08-2011, 12:47 AM
Well, after learning a few things in the last cook (http://forum.texasbbqrub.com/showthread.php?t=41470), I gave the butcher paper technique a go for the big Super Bowl brisket cook over the weekend. We didn't photodocument this cook (not much different to see), but I would still like to share what I learned this time around.

First off, my wife purchased a full untrimmed packer cut choice brisket from our local Target. I got after it and trimmed down the fat cap to between 1/4-to-1/2-inch, trying to stay as even as I could, before applying the seasoning. Wound up trimming off almost 2 pounds of fat and still had plenty left on top, yielding around an 8 pound brisket. As far as the seasoning paste goes, I mixed in just under a tablespoon of Chinese hoisin sauce with the Lea & Perrins in an attempt to enhance the sweetness. I also used a little bit less Old No. 2 rub, since the last cook had some excess heat/spicyness issues as it came off the BGE.

Fuel again consisted of Ozark Oak lump, with a few chunks of Weber Firespice pecan wook buried through the mix. I used fewer pecan chunks this time, since last time I had an issue with the fire trying to go out in the middle of the cook (I think that may have been due to too high a wood-to-lump ratio). To make up for the reduced number of chunks, I scattered some Jack Daniels smoking chips across the top of the lump so that I'd get an added layer of smoky flavor at the beginning of the cook.

I narrowly averted a possible disaster at the beginning caused by an overzealous attempt at getting the BGE temp down to the right range - in short, I killed the fire and had to re-start it. Fortunately this happened at the very beginning, so the meat suffered no ill effects from my screw-up. I was very careful for the remainder of the cook and managed to finish it without killing the fire again.

The meat went on the (finally lit) BGE shortly before noon Saturday, fat side up, with a temperature probe inserted through the side of the middle part of the flat set for 195 degrees. The probe's alarm surprised us when it went off around six hours later, erroneously saying the brisket was ready. A spot check of temps in other areas verified the error, which I chalked up to the flat of this particular piece of meat being relatively thin compared to the point.

At this point I decided to go ahead and do the butcher paper wrap that I mentioned in my earlier post in this thread. I'd wanted to do the wrap at the 8 hour mark, but I figured I'd take advantage of the alarm-induced snafu and hold off on testing an 8-hour unwrapped smoke for a future cook. The wrap wasn't the neatest looking thing you've ever seen, but it did cover the brisket well enough. I used butcher's twine instead of paper tape to keep the wrap in place. (The butcher paper did not burn, BTW, nor did the twine.) The butcher paper had one unexpected effect on the cook - it allowed the meat to stay at a plateau temperature for a *very* long time. In fact, the meat hit two plateaus - one at 170, and another at 190. Both lasted for a couple of hours, with the pit temperature stable around 225.

The probe (now placed in a thicker part of the meat closer to the center of the entire brisket) finally sounded off at around 6 AM Sunday morning, after the meat had spent a total of 18 hours on the smoker. I pulled the brisket and put it straight into a foam chest, still wrapped in the butcher paper and swaddled in a towel for extra insulation. It stayed there for two hours, bringing the entire cook time to 20 hours.

My wife and I sliced into the meat after the two hour rest and tested a few pieces. I don't think it would have won any awards, but IMHO it still came out pretty good. The butcher paper allowed the fat to render without killing the bark that developed in the first six hours, and the meat was well-smoked, tender, and juicy throughout, with no excessive spice heat and with some decent caramelization here and there. After sampling the cook's portion, I sliced up the meat and put it in the fridge to rest until the party.

I was personally a little disappointed with the way it reheated this time - IMHO, something was lost compared to the previous no-butcher-paper cook. The spice level was definitely down, which my wife chalked up to the reduced amount of rub that I used. Nevertheless, no one else seemed to notice anything wrong with the brisket, and in the end the reviews from the partygoers were all positive.

In summary, here's what my wife and I learned in this cook:

1. Have patience when starting the fire - don't force the temperature down by shutting the dampers off too much. Let it fall slowly and naturally.
2. If your flat is on the thin side, don't be afraid to move the temperature probe a little closer to the center of the brisket.
3. A couple of teaspoons of hoisin mixed with the worcestershire helps caramelization and bark formation. A bit more hoisin might work even better.
4. Don't skimp on the rub if using the butcher paper wrap method, especially if you plan to reheat the brisket. If overspicyness *does* becomes an issue, balance it by adding some brown sugar to the rub.
5. Butcher paper wrap works better than foil since it "breathes" and doesn't make the bark soggy, but the trade-off is that the cook will take longer.
6. Six hours unwrapped makes for a good bark, but eight hours probably would have worked better.

I hope this experience will help anyone considering the butcher paper method, and I would appreciate any and all feedback and suggestions on how to improve my next cook. Thanks!

ljfnord
02-08-2011, 05:58 AM
Update:

Since the previous post, I have heard from a couple of the partygoers who retained some of the leftovers. They said that yet another day of refrigeration did improve the flavor.

Makes me wish I'd kept more of my own leftovers so that I could verify this. Go figure. :banghead:

CheeseheadJohn
02-14-2011, 12:17 PM
Im a new guy too, done a few 5-6 lb briskets, 2 at a time, been pretty darn good too, keepin a good log...my concern is over-cookin to dry meat, so I run at 225F on my brinkmann horizontal with water pan, start at 10am, at 3pm (5 hrs) at internal 170F place in foil tray pan and cover tight with foil, put back on smoker, add coals for 1.5 -2 hrs more and remove to rest (still covered) another 1+hrs to final 180-190F...IMHO really great results and ready for dinner same day, tender, juicy, great flavors (btw I use whirsteshire & TXBBQ rub overnite in plastic bag) and use oak first 3 hrs only

smokenjoe
05-06-2011, 04:17 PM
thanks for the post. don't have the patients for the low and slow. hell ill give it a try

totally smoked
05-07-2011, 06:11 PM
Well ljfnord, I for one very much enjoy your detailed account's, and wish that I could do the same. I've seen the butcher paper rolls there and been wondering if it would be worth tryin..I'll be looking into this, again, Thanks for your detailed account and time put into it. :thumbs:

DerrikMo
05-23-2011, 11:48 AM
Needing a little advice, I have cooked a bunch of briskets in my time, but it seems that I can get my biggest part of my Brisket very tender, BUT I always get the tail end very dry??? Ive always smoked on a Oklahoma Joes smoker with side fire box for many years, but my wife for christmas just purchased me a 40 in Masterbuilt electric smoker and I figured I would try a brisket 1st, I have attached a picture of the smoker. I smoked with mesquite wood chips and set the temp for 225, after 8 hours I wrapped it and poured Bill's sauce that I made from his recipe on it and cooked until temp was at 200 and wrapped in towel and throw in cooler for few hours, it was great, as are ALL Bill's wonderful recipes, might I added, between his RUBS, Knives and gloves and recipe's, everyone and my neighbor hood thinks I am the KING of BBQ, Thanks Bill, just looking for a little advice, BTW, the electric smoker gave another reason to start a outdoor project my cooking shack, I started with BAMBOO walls, more pics to come in the future....


I was just wondering how you like you Masterbuilt smoker. I have read a few reviews that said the smoke flavor was lacking as compared to an offset or non-electric smoker. Do you find that to be the case? I am very interested in one of these, even though I am currently using an offset. I would appreciate any comments you have.
DerrikM

Philistine
06-12-2011, 05:10 PM
Not sure if I am off topic but this thread seemed closest to my dilemma. I can't seem to be consistent in my finished product with brisket. I have made a mouthwatering masterpiece with lump charcoal on a $40.00 brinkman smoke n grill and last night produced a sub par effort on a new rock and fire brick giant smoker that has a great flavor but is just not moist. I had the pit built in March and this was my first brisket on it. Unfortunately I don't have a lot of time to practice as the family is coming July 4th and expecting a Snow's BBQ experience. Any tips or suggestions?

Thanks,
Skip

Fred
06-12-2011, 08:43 PM
No two briskets are alike & is often the culprit in a not so great product - while practicing can get expensive it's really the only way to improve - start with a 'choice' well marbled brisket & follow Bills method - it should work out fine

Texas 1836
06-13-2011, 07:10 AM
Howdy Philistine. Welcome to the forum. When you get a chance slide down to the new members section and introduce yourself. Sounds like you have the basics, but a machinery change got you. I can't tell from the picture where your firebox is. Is this offset? Number one is to make sure you know what's happening inside your cabinet. Get some oven thermometers and so some temp checks if you haven't already. Like Fred said, practice and start with a good cut of meat. From there keep your temp low and monitor the internal temp of the meat. Good luck!

Whiskey Girl
06-15-2011, 01:09 PM
Lots of good advice here . . . Texas BBQ Rub has no doubt won me lots of trophies . . . I have perfected my ribs (it's a given), brisket is about 95% given, but I am gett'n my butt kicked all over the place on my chicken. . . I've judged numerous competitions, and don't understand what I'm doing wrong. . . oh well, still work'n on it . . .

I can't really say how long I cook brisket . . . but, I'm definitely a true believer in keeping them wrapped in cooler at least four hours before a cut. Don't know what goes on in that cooler once I shut the lid, but it works. . . wg

Texas 1836
06-15-2011, 02:37 PM
Sounds like you are smacking em down WG! Congrats and keep it up!

Philistine
06-18-2011, 12:09 PM
Howdy Philistine. Welcome to the forum. When you get a chance slide down to the new members section and introduce yourself. Sounds like you have the basics, but a machinery change got you. I can't tell from the picture where your firebox is. Is this offset? Number one is to make sure you know what's happening inside your cabinet. Get some oven thermometers and so some temp checks if you haven't already. Like Fred said, practice and start with a good cut of meat. From there keep your temp low and monitor the internal temp of the meat. Good luck!

Fixing to try this again. Thanks for the input. I think I was too hot after reading some other folks here. I have half a bag of original that is about to go to work at 225 on a 12-1/2 pounder. Thanks again.

also, fire area is under the big lid on the left side of the pit looking at it from the front as in the photo. I place the brisket in the tall cabinet door about midway up on the middle rack with a pan of dr. pepper on the rack beneath it. fat side down.

Texas 1836
06-18-2011, 03:03 PM
Approach sounds good but stick you a cheap oven thermometer in the cabinet to make sure what your temp is. Good luck!

CheeseheadJohn
06-23-2011, 09:33 AM
Brisket update: I'm on about my 8th Brisket cook now, and have dialed in this Brinkman horizontal pretty good, after re-locating the smoke stack to the far end at grate level from the top...I cruise at 250ish and do a Brisket in about 7 hrs total (5 lbs each) with done temp at 185ish...I do cover in foil at about 170 and keep cookin for 1-2 hrs more, sometimes cheat and finish in oven at 300F for an hour, then rest for an hour...one key I find is keep those juices and after cutting meat, pour some on the meat to re-flavor it some, really makes a diference, plus any leftovers should include juices in the baggies/tupperware to keep moist and for flavor...oak is prefered wood for me...I think I cook a bit hotter than most but have had good results in the 7-8 hr range, on at 10am, eat at 6pm...so good BBQ sauce only served on the side as optional...good stuff

CheeseheadJohn
06-23-2011, 10:03 AM
almost forgot my favorite technique Ive tried...the hound Huck becomes known as Smokey when he wakes up the gal and has that charcoal smell to him...a new technique is to go golf 9 holes with the pals during the cook and leave her some basic instructions for checkin temps, adding coal/wood and such (reminding her "if lookin aint cookin"), as she earns my trust and I gain confidence in her, Ive been able to extend this program to allow 18 holes, sometimes 19 holes...Ive even allowed her to open the cook chamber to wrap a brisket in foil or flip some ribs, but usually when Im on the cell giving instruction and always under the close supervision of Smokey, unless he's with me on the cart, it takes some time and patience but worth the effort to incorporate the lady into the BBQ process. In other news, I met a gent with a BBQ shop in Marion IL at Pops BBQ, very good...we talked brisket and I have my 7 hr technique and he sometimes goes 5 hrs on smoker then 1.5 hrs in oven covered at 350 for another express method, need to try but now gettin dangerously close to that 19th hole timeframe...

Duganboy
07-27-2011, 08:57 AM
Well getting ready for Super Bowl Sunday and think I will fire up the pit and cook a few briskets. Have some people who would like me to cook them brisket, ribs, and chickens. Slow smoked at 200 degrees for 18 hours using TexasBBQRub and they are perfect. Here is all I do. First take a whole untrimmed brisket and cover one side with worcheshire sauce. Then take a handful of rub and spread it across the meat covering everything on the sides too. Flip it over and repeat the process. I put the brisket on the pit, fat side down, cook at 200-215 degrees indirect heat using mesquite wood for 18 hours. I do wrap the briskets around 12 hours. This is a wonderful piece of meat, juicy and tender. I don't use any sauce for my brisket but some prefer sauce on their meat.

Bill Cannon
TexasBBQRub.com
I'm confused by the instructions. When you get to the part about the aluminum foil, the instructions say to add 1 to 1/2 cup of the bbq that you just made. Is this talking about the rub or sauce. No mention of making sauce is anywhere in the above recipe. Can't wait to try this, but don't want to mess this part up.

redneck cooker
07-27-2011, 08:59 AM
I'm confused by the instructions. When you get to the part about the aluminum foil, the instructions say to add 1 to 1/2 cup of the bbq that you just made. Is this talking about the rub or sauce. No mention of making sauce is anywhere in the above recipe. Can't wait to try this, but don't want to mess this part up.

No sauce in foil......When you wrap the brisket, put a can of beef broth or coke in the foil, will help with the terderization process...:thumbs:

Duganboy
07-27-2011, 10:29 AM
No sauce in foil......When you wrap the brisket, put a can of beef broth or coke in the foil, will help with the terderization process...:thumbs:
Thanks, Redneck!!

redneck cooker
07-27-2011, 10:30 AM
Your welcome anytime...:thumbs:

smokenjoe
08-12-2011, 11:50 PM
great info 200 deg is the ticket 211 water boils 200 keeps it moist

Duganboy
08-13-2011, 12:08 PM
Bill or other expert, do you measure the temp in the flat of the brisket or the point? TIA

cappy
08-13-2011, 12:36 PM
Bill or other expert, do you measure the temp in the flat of the brisket or the point? TIA

The flat - and through the side.

See:

http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6027/6012683852_80235b390d_b.jpg

It should be in a representative area of thickness, centered on the side. In other words, don't put it at the very tip of the flat or in the thicker part of the flat close to the point, but somewhere in between.

Duganboy
08-13-2011, 12:40 PM
The flat - and through the side.

See:

http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6027/6012683852_80235b390d_b.jpg

It should be in a representative area of thickness, centered on the side. In other words, don't put it at the very tip of the flat or in the thicker part of the flat close to the point, but somewhere in between.
Thanks Cappy. Makes sense and the picture was, as they say, "worth a 1000 words".

Jmoney7269
10-17-2011, 11:50 AM
I'm always lookin for ways to make better brisket. I'm a newbie on this site but do cook pretty good BBQ. 180 or so for 2-3 hrs with mesquite and oak, then 250 after that till 160 internal. Foil till 195-200 internal.

http://i897.photobucket.com/albums/ac174/justinmargist/40f4db23.jpg
http://i897.photobucket.com/albums/ac174/justinmargist/d269a477.jpg

AustinKnight
04-20-2012, 05:49 PM
I like aged briskets about 60 days maybe keep them in rotation in the mini fridge, equal parts of kosher salt,coarse black pepper, salt free lemon pepper(Mrs dash) light a full chimney of lump let it ash over then dump it in the middle of my charcoal basket I cook on a UDS. Set the DigiQ to 225 put the brisket on at that temp for a few hours then ramp up the temp 350* to finish it off and wrap it in butcher paper and rest it in a cooler for 4 hours rest is key I pull at 205-210 when it's toothpick tender :) I just got old #2 and GC rubs so I'll be doing a aged brisket May 5 I'll post the end results.
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-a6XaVv8SXQI/T25zr_zi7JI/AAAAAAAABJk/0OulcNsfHRw/s640/P3240015.JPG
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-pkk7DFo1YBM/T25zrKd45VI/AAAAAAAABJc/bzZ0YvFkRvQ/s640/P3240013.JPG

bigwheel
04-21-2012, 09:58 AM
Looks mighty tasty. Welcome.

Brisket Bob
04-21-2012, 01:22 PM
Pretty pics all around.

AustinKnight
04-21-2012, 01:43 PM
Thx bigwheel.

Texana
04-22-2012, 04:29 PM
Bill or other expert, do you measure the temp in the flat of the brisket or the point? TIA

In the point ....

LTM
09-01-2012, 01:48 PM
I have a new hybrid charcoal/gas bbq to break in today. I bought a 8 1/2 pound beef round sirloin tip roast to cook this afternoon.

I have the charcoal lit and cedar chips standing by. Can someone tell me how long to cook it and at what temperature?

Do i need to season or baste it? Any help is appreciated!

BluDawg
09-01-2012, 02:23 PM
Keep it simple 1 part each K salt and med grind black pepper. 300 for 4 hrs Wrap it in BP until it probes tender and let it rest until the IT is 150 or less before slicing.

choinga
09-01-2012, 05:34 PM
uh, 130 degrees to finish?

TexasBrisket
01-02-2013, 08:24 PM
Howdy! I slow smoke over pecan wood/charcoal for about 8-10 at 190 to 205.I mop and turn to get a good crust on each side once an hour for about 4 hours.I feed my fire with a couple more coals/wood,mop both sides and leave it on the pit for a good 2 1/2 hours.I flip it one last time,moppin' both sides and continue to let it smoke no higher than 200 degrees for the last 2-3 hours.I normally wait about 30 minutes before slicing.Your brisket should almost pull apart with no effort.Happy Qin' and Gig'em!:thumbs:

Wick
02-07-2013, 04:36 AM
In this recipe does he use the Texas BBQ Original Rub or the #2 Brisket Blend? I'm trying to make it exactly like he did in the description.



"Place the brisket on the first sheet of foil. Fold up the edges of the foil to keep the sauce we are getting ready to add from getting everywhere. Take about 1 - 1 ˝ cups of the bbq you made earlier and pour over the brisket (you should still be fat side down). Now wrap it in the first piece of foil, then wrap another piece around that. Place it back on the pit, fat side down again. Finish cooking."


Now, in this part: I read that somebody said it's actually 1-1/2 cups of beef broth that you pour on top while foiling. Are we talking like Swanson's store bought beef broth, or we talking beef broth from pan drippings? It says BBQ. What's going on here? Is there a full recipe somebody can post? I've been looking for it for two days. :willynilly:

txsmkmstr
02-07-2013, 07:13 AM
It's the #2 Brisket Blend he uses - really outstanding stuff...

The "bbq" in the recipe is actually the BBQ Sauce that he has the recipe for further down. However, many different liquids can be used including Coke (no diet), Dr. Pepper, beef broth (Swanson's is fine) or anything you please.

The last couple of briskets I've stayed away from using liquid as the brisket seems to render quite a bit of juicy goodness but I recommend you try his method once before moving on to "your" style of brisket. Be sure to take some notes along the way for future cooks.

BTW... Welcome in - hop over to the new member section if you haven't done so already.

Edit: Went back to the first post and see the sauce recipe is not part of it. This information is usually sent out in a email newsletter and has that sauce right below the cooking instructions. I'll hunt around for it and post up later.

Found the sauce link - check it out here....

http://forum.texasbbqrub.com/showthread.php?t=38338

Wick
02-07-2013, 03:48 PM
OK. Thanx. I'm going to have to make that. I don't really have a brisket style. I just figured Texas has the best. So, I want to do it like that. I've tried other styles of recipes for brisket and they didn't turn out well. This one sounds good though.

BluDawg
02-08-2013, 09:51 AM
:!: True"Texas Brisket" is S&P rub, cooked to probe tender with Post oak, Pecan or Mesquite, no foil, just heat & meat. Sauce, Complex Rubs, Injection, Marinates & foil are not traditional Tx. BBQ :stirthepot:

Wick
02-08-2013, 10:43 AM
Yeah, I just wanted a little more than salt, pepper, and cayenne. I'll cook off some straight-up-Texas-Style Brisket, and right now I'm looking for something other than a contest style.

So, maybe it's more of a modified Texas Style that I'm after.

Half Fast BBQ'n
02-08-2013, 12:50 PM
Yeah, I just wanted a little more than salt, pepper, and cayenne. I'll cook off some straight-up-Texas-Style Brisket, and right now I'm looking for something other than a contest style.

So, maybe it's more of a modified Texas Style that I'm after.

Wick, "Texas Brisket" is subjective. Many Texans cook briskets with rubs and/or with added juices (injections, etc), and other Texans love it with ONLY Salt & Pepper... etc. etc.

If you are looking for a great brisket, you will find many members that can direct you to their personal choice and TEXAS style briskets. Find a method that you think you might like and go for it. It ain't rocket science (but then, I can't cook) :D

BluDawg
02-08-2013, 02:49 PM
Wick, "Texas Brisket" is subjective. Many Texans cook briskets with rubs and/or with added juices (injections, etc), and other Texans love it with ONLY Salt & Pepper... etc. etc.

If you are looking for a great brisket, you will find many members that can direct you to their personal choice and TEXAS style briskets. Find a method that you think you might like and go for it. it ain't rocket science (but then, I can't cook) :D Well at least your man enough to admit it:roflmaoha0:

Backyard BBQ
02-25-2013, 08:12 PM
Taste in BBQ is very subjective. Bark preference on beef is subjective. That said, I prefer to cook both Brisket and Chuck Cut Beef Short Ribs rubbed simply with good salt and good coarse pepper. I don't wrap in foil because I am not trying to cook a steamed roast any more. I have moved past just cooking a tender brisket, now I target something different. I'll cook a 10-12 lb Natural Angus brisket at 225 until it's got "the right feel" when inserting the Thermapen, and then let it rest for a few hours before serving. I say feel is more important than a hard line on internal temp. It's been taking about 22 hours of heat. I can't tend to my pit for that long and I would need to wrap in Butcher Paper to keep smoke off the meat after several hours on the pit. I smoke at 225 for about 7 hours then place unwrapped meat in the oven (above a foil pan to catch drippings) at 225 overnight and into the next day. Cut it properly and serve it to people who appreciate BBQ and the work that goes into it.

If you have not tried the Chuck Cut Beef Ribs, please do. You'll probably have to ask your butcher for them. You'll know you have the right one when you see about 1.5 inch thick Chuck sitting on top of a rack of ribs. Do not buy the one with the Chuck trimmed off. Cook these like you do your brisket, and do remove the "kevlar" membrane from the lung side of the ribs. John Mueller got me started cooking them...This will get you started http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZGOQ_npS4pI

BluDawg
02-25-2013, 08:40 PM
Crank up that pit to 300 and get the same results in 6 hrs.

Backyard BBQ
02-26-2013, 08:08 AM
BluDawg, I will take your advice and try just that. Thanks!

Backyard BBQ
03-03-2013, 10:25 AM
I tried the 300 deg cook on a Natural Angus 10 lb brisket. After 6 hours on the pit, unwrapped, it had great bark, looked great. I spritzed with water and worchestershire. Had a water pan. Cooked on oak. The internal temps checked out fine on both point and flat. It just wasn't to the point of tenderness which I prefer. Most people would have loved this finished meat. But, how many of them would have asked for sauce and bread too? Theres part of my problem...My problem is that brisket isn't my favorite to eat or to cook...so when I do make it I am very picky. I want the tenderness of a steamed foil wrapped brisket coupled with the bark of unwrapped meat...and I want it enjoyed by all without sauce, because its so good it doesn't need any. The whole "do ya put ketchup on steak" question. So I am a slave to 225 low and too damn long slow...until I find another way. Heck I cook my spares for 6 hours! No wonder I don't like brisket cooked in 6!

Thanks to all yall for the advice, different cooking styles, etc. I will continue to experiment of course! Yet for now my method for brisket is the pit coupled with the oven overnight as i outlined previously in this thread. I have served my brisket. to folks who appreciate brisket and they rave about how different mine is from theirs and others they have eaten. I am convinced this "difference" is also why people rave over Aaron Franklin and John Mueller brisket...they are different and better than most, if not all, others. Its because of those two guys' briskets that I got back into cooking brisket...trying to replicate theirs. If you try out my method let me know how you liked the finished product versus your usual finished brisket, I'm curious.

SPS
03-24-2013, 08:40 PM
Hey Backyard BBQ- I just moved away from Boerne/Comfort. Was living in Comfort and worked at Tootie Pie in Boerne as the warehouse/logistics manager