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View Full Version : how do you thicken bbqsauce?


smokesignals
06-25-2006, 12:35 AM
Just curious if someone knows what makes some bbq sauces thick and sticky. I am playing with a honey and juice glaze but its too runny and wont stick to the ribs.

Thanks in advance.

Bad Santa
06-25-2006, 12:46 AM
Honey, mole asses, jellies, syrups, etc will thicken sauces.....fruit juices will thin out sauces. You can also reduce a sauce to thicken it up some, but the others work faster with better results.

M38A1
06-25-2006, 03:51 AM
What would a tad bit, as in very small amount, of corn starch do?

Woodman
06-25-2006, 06:44 AM
Nothing beats good old "reduction" time in the pan!

Txngent
06-25-2006, 09:33 AM
I'm like Woodman, cooking it down will maintain the original flavor... little more intense.

Uncle Al
06-25-2006, 09:37 AM
Most commercial sauces use high fructose corn syrup or corn syrup solids to create thickness. Also the use of thickened tomato products (ketchup, paste etc.) is common.

I agree with the others, that the best way is good ol' time in the pot.

Al

HockeyDad
06-25-2006, 11:30 AM
Like the others, I've gotten the best results simmerin' it in the pot......Depending on the size of the batch, I generally reduce it for an hour or two, I like it thick. Sometimes though, I kinda forget about it and gets a little thicker than I wanted....

Mic
06-25-2006, 02:04 PM
While we're on the subject of sauces and with no intention of highjacking this thread off the orginal question :oops: I have made up a gallon today and want to put some up in mason jars to give out at my family reunion next Sat. Never done it before! :oops: How do ya seal the jars once the sauce is in em? :? :? Just curious then ya can have the thread back!! :roll: :wink:

Mic

Uncle Al
06-25-2006, 02:42 PM
O.K I don't want to be called a highjacker but...

I buy Qt size "Ball" brand jars. I boil the jars the lids (part with the rubber seal) and the bands (part with the threads that holds the lid on the jar). Then take them out of the water and let them dry.
Then pour the "HOT" BBQ sauce into the jars leaving a 1/4 inch space from the brim of the jar. Place the lid onto the jar and then lightly screw the band onto the jar. After the sauce cools and the lid is sucked down, I tighten the band. DONE.

Al

Mic
06-25-2006, 02:55 PM
O.K I don't want to be called a highjacker but...

I buy Qt size "Ball" brand jars. I boil the jars the lids (part with the rubber seal) and the bands (part with the threads that holds the lid on the jar). Then take them out of the water and let them dry.
Then pour the "HOT" BBQ sauce into the jars leaving a 1/4 inch space from the brim of the jar. Place the lid onto the jar and then lightly screw the band onto the jar. After the sauce cools and the lid is sucked down, I tighten the band. DONE.

Al

Thanks Uncle Al! 8) Seems simple enuff! :wink:

Mic

Txngent
06-25-2006, 09:04 PM
I do the same as Uncle Al, but after I put the lid and ring on, I do a 10min. boiling water bath. It is the same way I do my jellies.

txpgapro
06-25-2006, 10:37 PM
I use the Foodsaver to suck the air out.

Grumpy Gator
06-26-2006, 12:35 AM
Xantham Gum or Carageenan.

Sounds like strange chemicals, but they are naturally occuring ingredients:

http://www.fitchicago.com/whatis.html

oregonboy
06-26-2006, 12:42 AM
I use suregel or pectin thickin up my sauce or sometimes cornstarch

TexLaw
06-26-2006, 09:21 AM
I really don't like what cornstarch does to a lot of sauces. It certainly has its place in the kitchen, but not in a barbeque sauce. That corny sweetness just doesn't make it with me. If you're using so little where you don't get that flavor, then you may as well spend a little more time with a slow, reducing simmer in the pot.


TL

gsmith
06-26-2006, 04:11 PM
I do the same as Uncle Al, but after I put the lid and ring on, I do a 10min. boiling water bath. It is the same way I do my jellies.

what type of ingredients do you all put into your sauces? could bill's sauce be canned? how long will it last?

Mic
06-26-2006, 07:54 PM
I use the Foodsaver to suck the air out.

Can't figger it out! :oops: :oops: :roll:

Mic

ozzie
06-26-2006, 10:03 PM
I asked this same question a few weeks back and I'll give the same advice I got because it works. Let it simmer on the stove until it's as thick as you want it. Works like a charm. I don't like what added thickeners do to the sauce. Just be patient and it will thicken and concentrate all those delicious flavors.

Bluegrass BBQ
06-26-2006, 10:51 PM
I agree with Uncle Al on the sealing of jars except I leave the lids in the hot water until I put them on the jar. I tighten the rig and wait until it seals and then in my experience you can take the ring off.

BBQ Angel
06-27-2006, 08:32 AM
When I make sauce, I start with a stick of butter, saute the onions and garlic in the butter, then add my brown sugar. I cook this mixture to about 234 degrees which is the soft-ball stage for making candy. I then add the rest of my ingredients. The sauce is always nice and thick. Always use equal amounts of butter and sugars, increase or decrease amounts depending on how much sauce you are making.

Txngent
06-27-2006, 09:27 AM
what type of ingredients do you all put into your sauces? could bill's sauce be canned? how long will it last?

You can can almost anything. If you are wanting to keep it fresh, but use within a week or two, vac sealing with food savers is fine... but all you are doing is removing the air from the jar and keeping the lid secure with a vac pressure(not preserving).

If you use the jelly process, you are killing any bacteria with heating the sauce and placing it in hot water sterolized glass jars/lids. Then boiling the secured jar/lid in water to remove the air from the jars via steam/heat pressure. The product will have a longer shelf life than vac sealing, but once opened it will need to be kept cool until used.

The "Ball Blue Book of Preserving" is a really good tutor on the how's and why's. Wally world sells the book, located in the canning section of the store. It also teaches about how to preserve high acidic foods vrs low acidic foods, which is very good to know if you are planning to do bbq sauces.

david brace
06-30-2006, 12:02 AM
A lot of answer say to simmer it down. I agree. THis is the way that I was taught years ago when I worked for a French chef in his private kitchens. It intensifies the flavor and thickens the sauce. A Winner...

DB